Stop and Consider

Such inspirational words. People, be aware and courteous to those around you! Don’t take anyone for granted.

A Want to Wander

How often do we walk around with tunnel vision? Not really paying attention to people, places or things around us. How often do we brush past people that we think has nothing to contribute to our day?  I struggle quite often with how much I matter. And to be honest I don’t really grasp it until someone belittles me in some way. Then the Queen of the Hill rears her big head and roars!  Point being.. situations like that shouldn’t have to be. Yes I should have a better sense of self worth. Got that on my to-do list. But, people matter. All people matter.  Try getting across town without that bus driver you just sneered at. She may only be a bus driver to you but she is someones mother that just had to put them in a daycare she can’t afford and walk to work in this monsoon…

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Using Cell Phone and Text Message Evidence to Your Advantage

I’m researching the admissibility of text messages as evidence (specifically, whether or not spousal privilege applies to these types of communication), and I found this blog during my search. It’s not completely in line with my topic, but I still think it has a lot of good information.

hammerblog

The near ubiquitous use of smartphones in the digital age has introduced a wealth of new evidence into many types of criminal cases.  Law enforcement routinely subpoenas cell phone records to obtain call records that might substantiate contact between a suspect and a victim or co-conspirator, obtain text messages which can be used as admissions or provide helpful context to the events surrounding a crime, and use cell phone tower information to pinpoint a suspect’s location at critical times.

However, law enforcement does not have a monopoly over this type of evidence.  Cell phone, text, and SMS records can be used by the defense to challenge an accuser’s credibility, establish that an accuser was not in fear of the accused, or corroborate an accused’s alibi.  This evidence is especially useful, and most likely to be present, in domestic violence cases.

If you are facing an accusation of domestic violence, it is critical…

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